Student Testimony Against Prohibition

Student Testimony Against Prohibition


In 1926, Senator James Reed of Missouri, an outspoken opponent of prohibition, arranged testimony before the Senate Committee on the Judiciary that supported his position. The following exchange occured between him and Russell Lee Post, a student at Yale University.

Senator Reed of Missouri. What are the facts with reference to the ability of students to obtain liquor?

Mr. Post. Why, it is obtainable, sir; the greater the attempts at enforcement the stronger the sentiment against it.

Senator Reed of Missouri. Do bootleggers ply their trade among the students?

Mr. Post. Well, it is the reverse; the students go to the bootleggers.

Senator Reed of Missouri. The students go to the bootleggers?

Mr. Post. Yes; they do not enter the university campus.

Senator Reed of Missouri. Is there any difficulty of any student of ordinary intelligence--and I presume they are all that at Yale University--getting all the whisky he wants to buy, or alleged whisky at least?

Mr. Post. No, sir.

Senator Reed of Missouri. Is this liquor drunk on the campus or in the quarters of the students?

Mr. Post. Yes, sir.

Senator Reed of Missouri And is it drunk elsewhere?

Mr. Post. Yes, sir.

Senator Reed of Missouri. That is all.